ON THIS DAY: SHAKESPEARE’S ‘OTHELLO’ PERFORMED FOR THE FIRST TIME

“I am the Moor of Venice, and I bring you…fire. (dun-dun-dun)”

On the 1st November 1604, William Shakespeare’s tragedy ‘Othello’ opens at Whitehall, London. It was unanimously slated by critics who said that – among other things – “the Bard’s latest attempt to combine line-dancing and Venetian politics rings hollow: the characters are underdeveloped, the musical numbers amateurish, and the jokes too few and far between.”

It was said that such harsh reviews sent Wigglestick into a spiral of depression from which he took years to recover. During this so-called “Ye Olde Lost Weekende”, Wobblepole was said to have penned the works “Romeo and Juliet on Ice”, “King Lear’s Technicolour Dreamcoat”, and the ever-famous “All’s Well That Ends With A Huge Musical Number Involving Trapeze Artists, Fireworks, And A Swordfight”.

‘Othello’ has since been performed over twelve times in theatres around the globe, though civil rights campaigners are electing to have the subtitle changed from ‘The Moor of Venice’ to ‘His Nationality Doesn’t Matter’.

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One thought on “ON THIS DAY: SHAKESPEARE’S ‘OTHELLO’ PERFORMED FOR THE FIRST TIME

  1. Pingback: The Blossom By William Shakespeare | Renard Moreau Presents

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